Devastating Legacy from the “Secret” War in Laos.

Devastating Legacy from the “Secret” War in Laos.

Above photo: Artillery rounds from the Vietnam War stacked up to be detonated along the Ho Chi Minh Trail, in Attapeu Province, Laos, by a UXO team.

This post is an edited version of an excellent article by Thin Lei Win. I have added the photos for illustration.

By Thin Lei Win

“Welcome to Laos, a country with the unwanted claim to fame of being the most bombed nation per capita in the world. Between 1964 and 1973, the U.S. military dropped more than 2 million tons of explosive ordnance, including an estimated 260 million cluster munitions – also known as bombies in Laos.

Detonation of unexploded ordnance in Laos, including white phosphorous munitions

Detonation of unexploded ordnance in Laos, including white phosphorous munitions

To put this into perspective, this is more bombs than fell on Europe during the entire course of World War Two.

The U.S. bombing was largely aimed at destroying the Ho Chi Minh Trail, the enemy supply lines during the Vietnam war which passed through Laos. The war ended nearly forty years ago, yet the civilian casualties continue. According to aid agency Handicap International, as many as 12,000 civilians have been killed or maimed since, and there are hundreds of new casualties every year.

Cluster bomblets on the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Attapeu, Laos

Cluster bomblets on the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Attapeu, Laos

Take Ta, a father of seven who lives in a remote village in Khammoune Province in southern Laos. One morning four years ago, he saw something that looked like a bombie.

He knew it was dangerous, but he had also heard that the explosive inside could be used for catching fish, so he decided to touch it with a stick.

That one small tap cost him both arms and an eye. Ta had to travel nine hours to get medical help. He sold his livestock to pay hospital bills, and when he ran out of things to sell, he went home.

Devastating injuries to a farmer in Sekong Province, Laos, caused by a cluster bomblet.

Devastating injuries to a farmer in Sekong Province, Laos, caused by a cluster bomblet.

Ta says he had to eat like a dog for four years, before non-governmental organisation COPE provided him with prosthetic arms. Now he is able to help in small domestic chores.

Then there is 31-year-old Yee Lee. He was digging around in his garden in August when suddenly his hoe came down hard on a bombie. He lost both legs and two fingers.

I met Lee at Xieng Khouang provincial hospital where he was having a moulding done for prosthetic legs. He was unsure and worried about what the future held.

I have five very young children, and my wife is six months pregnant, he said. For now, his elderly parents and younger brother help his family. I hope, with the prosthetic leg, to get back to work either in the field or around the house.

A live mortar shell in the jungle, Attapeu Province, Laos

A live mortar shell in the jungle, Attapeu Province, Laos

Unfortunately, most survivors are unable to continue physical work, even if, like Lee, they receive free treatment and prosthetic limbs from agencies such as COPE and World Education .

A prosthetic leg that can last up to two years costs as little as $50, yet in a country consistently ranked one of the region’s poorest and where almost 30 percent of the population live on less than $1 a day, this is more than most families can afford. Worse, loss of a breadwinner means loss of income and increased poverty.

Cluster bombs are dropped by planes or fired by mortars. They open mid-air releasing multiple explosive sub-munitions that scatter over a large area. These bomblets are usually the size of tennis balls.

UXO team deal with an aeroplane bomb in the jungle along the Ho Chin Minh Trail, in Sekong Province, Laos.

UXO team deal with an aeroplane bomb in the jungle along the Ho Chin Minh Trail, in Sekong Province, Laos.

Aid agencies say the indiscriminate nature of these weapons and the fact many bomblets fail to go off mean they have a devastating humanitarian impact. On December 3 this year, over 100 nations will sign an international treaty to ban the use of cluster bombs.

In Laos, it’s thought that around 30 percent of bombies failed to explode on impact, leaving about 80 million live munitions lying on or under the soil which has posed a serious threat to people’s lives and livelihood.

So far, fewer than 400,000 bombies have been cleared, a meagre 0.47 per cent. The United Nations estimates almost half of all cluster munition victims are from Laos.

Cluster bomblet on the Ho Chi Minh Trail, Attapeu, Laos.

Cluster bomblet on the Ho Chi Minh Trail, Attapeu, Laos.

Even with community awareness programmes run by national authority UXO Laos, with support from numerous aid agencies, the injuries and deaths continue. Sometimes people touch the bombies out of ignorance, other times it’s out of curiosity (children) or for economic reasons (adults).

With scrap metal going at $1 to $3 a kilogramme, some people collect war remnants to sell, and this includes unexploded ordnance.

Xieng Khouang, in northern Laos, is one of the most affected areas, where more than 500,000 tons of bombs were dropped. The mountainous and beautiful terrain is marred by craters of all sizes. Locals liken it to the surface of the moon and  it is littered with metal shrapnel.

Children are at constant risk. In a small village school 20 minutes from the provincial capital, 248 bombies were found in a 4,200 sq metre area.

The province is also famous for the Plain of Jars, a vast plateau of ancient stone jars whose origins remain a mystery. But the amount of war debris scattered between the giant jars has seriously hampered archaeologists’ efforts to find out more about them.

Another live cluster bomblet, a BLU-3, "Pineapple", again dropped on Laos during the Vietnam War.

Another live cluster bomblet, a BLU-3, “Pineapple”, again dropped on Laos during the “Secret” War.

David Hayter, country director of MAG, says the sad truth is that Laos will never be 100 percent rid of cluster bombs.

“The priority is in clearing the land where people are living and working,” he said. “We are teaching them to learn to live safely within the environment. It’s a mixture of education and clearance.”

Our new film, M.I.A. A Greater Evil. Set in the jungles of Laos and Vietnam, the film deals with the possible fate of US servicemen left behind after the US pulled out of the Vietnam War.

MIA button

See the trailer for our new film, M.I.A. A Greater Evil. Set in the jungles of Laos and Vietnam, the film deals with the possible fate of US servicemen left behind after the US pulled out of the Vietnam War.

And for POWs left behind in Laos:

And: http://peteralanlloyd.com/back-part-2/uxo-unexploded-bombs-in-the-jungles-of-attapeu-laos/

And: http://peteralanlloyd.com/back-part-2/how-to-blow-yourself-up-with-vietnam-war-cluster-bombs-in-laos/

Peter Alan Lloyd

Reviews: Amazon.co.uk: Customer Reviews 

UK: Amazon.co.uk: BACK Parts 1 and 2 

US: Amazon: Back Parts 1 and 2

Smashwords: Back Parts 1 and 2

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Front cover of BACK Part 1.

Front cover of BACK Part 1.

Front cover of BACK Part 2.

Front cover of BACK Part 2.

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1 Comment

  1. Thomas Peters

    One mine, one life.

    The AMERICAN WAR in Vietnam was not a war, it was a U.S. war crime and all involved are war criminals! No heroes, no veterans .. just war criminals, child murders.

    One mine, one life.

    Laos is the most heavily bomb country per capita in the world. During the AMERICAN WAR in Vietnam from 1964-1973 there were 260 million bombs dropped on Laos by the US Air Force. There are about 80 million of unexploded ordinances left after the war ended. More than 40 years after the end of the AMERICAN WAR, people in Lao, especially the children, continue to live in danger from unexploded bombs. These deadly items threaten their lives and hinder development. Wherever you look, everywhere one finds remnants of the destruction.

    One mine, one life.

    United States of America, these unexploded ordinances are yours. UXO clearance means, take 80 million U.S. citizens, bring them to Lao and cast them like a flock of sheep on the rice fields and on the places where children plays .. and who still has arms and legs to walk, bring them to Afghanistan and Iraq and cast them through the desert and the world will be a little more peaceful and hopeful.

    One mine, one life.

    Reply

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