Aussie Vets return Vietnam War Relics to North Vietnamese Families.

Aussie Vets return Vietnam War Relics to North Vietnamese Families.

Above Photo: Image of a woman found on a dead Vietnamese soldier during the Vietnam War (abc.net.au)

Australian veterans of the Vietnam War are continuing their quest to return items that belonged to Vietnamese soldiers.

“Operation Wandering Souls,” initiated by an Australian team including Derril de Heer and Bob Hall from New South Wales University at the Australian Defense Force Academy, will send more items back to Vietnam including letters, sketches, poems, commendation certificates and photos of Vietnamese veterans.

BACK vietnam war modern backpackers in asia crossover novel disappearances in laos jungles POWs mystery MIA missing Vietnam war mysteries and jungle secrets Vietnam war bombs jungle unexploded ordnance laos wartime relics MIA A greater evil wandering lost Vietnamese MIAs

A rainy night – painting found during the Vietnam War. (abc.net.au)

The program, which was instituted in 2010, makes use of Australian war records, maps, soldiers’ diaries and other artifacts from the battles to create a comprehensive database – the first of its kind – that indicates the approximate burial site of 3,796 Vietnamese soldiers. The remains of around 450 Vietnamese war soldiers have been located so far as a result.

Vietnam war secret war in laos POWs MIAs wartime mysteries and jungle war secrets Vietnam and laos POWs MIAs left behind in the jungle secret north Vietnamese Vietnam war unexploded ordnance jungle dangers backpackers Vietnam war wandering souls north Vietnamese army MIA missing

Another painting found during the war. (abc.net.au)

“In Vietnamese culture it’s very important to find the remains of those who die, particularly those who die a violent death and whose grave sites are unknown,” Hall, a military historian and the project’s leader, told ABC News, a major US television network.

“If that remains aren’t found, then the souls are deemed to be wandering.”

Hall said the operation was launched as a way of returning the favor Vietnam showed Australia in helping it locate the remains of its last six soldiers missing in action.

BACK vietnam war modern backpackers in asia crossover novel disappearances in laos jungles POWs mystery MIA missing Vietnam war mysteries and jungle secrets Vietnam war bombs jungle unexploded ordnance laos wartime relics MIA A greater evil wandering lost Vietnamese MIAs

One of 37 sketches in a notebook of a Vietnamese soldier killed during a battle at a rubber plantation in Ba Ria-Vung Tau. (abc.net.au)

Vietnam is still searching for the remains of approximately 300,000 soldiers listed as missing in action during the Vietnam War, including those of nearly 4,000 believed to have been killed in battles against troops from Australia and New Zealand. Hall said his project aims to help Vietnamese families heal as much as possible from the loss of their loved ones.

Derril de Heer said that he was very happy to be able to return these personal remnants.

He and Australian veteran Laurens Wildeboer have visited Vietnam, returning books and a scarf of a fallen Vietnamese soldier to his 85-year-old mother in Dong Nai Province, which Wildeboer had been holding onto for more than 40 years, after Vietnamese veterans helped track her down.

For a modern-day take on the Vietnam War and Adventure Backpackers trekking into the jungles of Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia, see: http://peteralanlloyd.com/back-part-2/backpackers-meet-the-vietnam-war-back-screenplay-finally-finished/

For POWs left behind in Laos, see also:

Peter Alan Lloyd

Reviews: Amazon.co.uk: Customer Reviews 

UK: Amazon.co.uk: BACK Parts 1 and 2 

US: Amazon: Back Parts 1 and 2

Smashwords: Back Parts 1 and 2

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/peter.lloyd.94064?fref=ts

Website: www.peteralanlloyd.com

Twitter: @PeterAlanLloyd

Front cover of BACK Part 1.

Front cover of BACK Part 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Front cover of BACK Part 2.

Front cover of BACK Part 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like this? Share it.

Related Posts

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *